Where is the Quality Assurance in Staffing?

Where is the Quality Assurance in Staffing?
on 13 Apr 2019 05:09 AM
  • Rang Technologies
  • This & That

I recently met with an old client of mine, let's call her 'Sally.' Sally has over 10 years MSP program management experience and is currently the Senior Program Manager for a large manufacturing company doing about $22 million in contingent spend. That includes Information Technology/Engineering, Professional Services and light industrial (assembly technicians, etc.).

Sally posed a question followed by a comment; "what ever happened to the quality of the submissions?" She continued, "it seems that everything is all about the speed and number of submissions that we just forget about the quality." I asked her to give me some examples. She said that many of the resumes she receives (across all categories) have unexplained employment gaps, work locations intentionally left off (I imagine people do this because they don't want to reveal that the consultant needs to do a temporary relo) and bad resumes that have no summary or at best, an extremely poorly written one and work experience that describes a job description instead of accomplishment and pertinent skills and experience that fit the job.

Sally said that the quality of the submission, i.e. resume is one of the biggest changes in the last several years. She is constantly having to go back to the agencies for clarification. For those agencies that are habitual abusers, she will by-pass those submissions. My two cents is that recruiters have stopped 'digging deep' in their interviews for fear of losing the candidate(s) and therefore don't get all the answers they need prior to submitting the candidate.

Questions about gaps in work history need to be addressed. Too many short-term assignments should be questioned and discussed. A candidates commute time is another topic that is often not discussed during an initial phone screen. Oh, and a poorly written resume should not be submitted. If a candidate is unwilling to take the advice that his/her resume needs to be a better document, my guess is that 99% of the time, that candidate isn't going to get the job.

We all know that working with MSP's is about speed and quantity of submissions. But it is mostly about the quality of the submission.