SAS is gaining prominence in healthcare

SAS is gaining prominence in healthcare
on 08 Apr 2020 19:22 PM
  • Rang Technologies
  • Data Science

SAS is gaining prominence in healthcare: -

When the transformation of healthcare into the digital era moves forward, there are resources that play a vital role in promoting the study of the production of the new wave of data. Statistical analysis systems (SAS) are one of the devices that has far-reaching benefits for the healthcare sector, from insurers to physicians and, of course, the patients themselves.

After its founding in 1976, the SAS Institute, the maker of statistical analysis systems, has evolved considerably. It started as a project to evaluate agricultural research at North Carolina State University has grown into a business and software that is used by Big Data experts from banking to pharmaceuticals to government agencies operating in every sector.

Today, SAS is moving health care analytics to new frontiers, optimizing results across the treatment continuum, from how health care providers assess success to clinical outcomes, and patient safety. SAS also plays a role in helping to recognize disease states and define approaches to commercialize drugs, according to the institute.

SAS unleashes predictive analytical capacity: -

Health companies can develop safer, more detailed and more accurate data through SAS programs. It also offers new methods for recording and displaying data.

To physicians, the ability to assess the efficacy of treatment and to build clinical profiles are some primary advantages of SAS services, which can provide information on the practice habits of a doctor and equate them with other doctors and industry standards.

The advantages of SAS systems are immense. This provides improved cost management and revenue creation, as well as allowing patients to investigate clinical outcomes and increasing the degree of patient care.

Another cloud analytics service called Viya was launched at the SAS Institute in early 2017 with a range of analytical tools aimed directly at healthcare providers.

Previous SAS products typically allowed the user to switch from one version to the next. However, according to an article in the Healthcare IT News, Viya uses current SAS technology technologies to provide new analytical insights, tools and techniques that can be used for deployment. The platform reads pictures as a type of data.

Mark Lambrecht, SAS Health and Lifesciences Global Practice's consultant said in Healthcare IT News: "The goal is to be able to incorporate analytical processes into the environment and to give you the right response at the right time.


Who Needs SAS Knowledge?

SAS technologies are used in a number of sectors but are increasingly omnipresent in healthcare. Jobs analysing health care, pharmacy, treatment, billing and government insurance data are proliferating and increasingly needed to understand SAS programming.

The SAS skills have reached 1 position with an average pay rise of 6.1% according to a report by the Money Magazine and the Payscale.com which outlined the skills that employers found the most important in 350 branches. Data mining and modelling were both highly useful competencies, both used in SAS operations.

The demand is rising fast for SAS accredited jobseekers. According to the SAS Institute, more than 80,000 businesses use SAS software, and the number of prospective employers using their tools would undoubtedly increase.

Throughout the world the promise of health analytics is welcomed by developed nations due to the problems they face around medication costs. A by-product of health analytics is high quality, economical services, and the demand for platforms and analytical services will therefore expand on a global scale.

According to a study from TMR Research, the only barrier to growth in health analysis is privacy issues and the lack of qualified persons. The biggest challenge can be clearly finding SEA trained professionals capable of taking on the role of extracting the most from the health data on the market as there is an increasing range of roles in this health sector that require awareness of SAS systems.